UK Detention in Focus

///UK Detention in Focus
UK Detention in Focus 2018-07-11T13:13:37+00:00

The UK Government has drawn criticism from regional and international bodies for its immigration detention policy and practice. Many of these bodies highlight the same concerns as the Detention Forum: the indefinite nature of immigration detention in the UK; the detention of vulnerable individuals and groups; the lack of robust, automatic judicial oversight; and insufficient attention to alternatives to detention.

European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT)

 

The European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) is a non-judicial preventive mechanism established under the Council of Europe’s European Convention for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. Committee members visit places of detention in each member state (including prisons, police stations, psychiatric hospitals and immigration detention centres) to assess the treatment of people deprived of their liberty. Afterwards, they send a detailed report with recommendations to the state government, and request a response. Visits usually take place every 4 years.

The Council of Europe is an international organisation whose aim is to uphold human rights, democracy and the rule of law in Europe. The UK is one of 47 member states, which include most of the 28 members of the European Union in addition to other states around the world. The Council cannot make binding laws, but it does have the power to enforce select international agreements reached by European states on various topics, including via the European Court of Human Rights.

The CPT’s Report to the UK Government (2017) 

The Committee visited Yarl’s Wood and Colnbrook Immigration Removal Centres (IRCs) and raised several concerns in its latest report:

  • The negative impact of the indefinite nature of detention was again noticeable during this visit, despite the fact that a number of inquiries have recently also challenged the lack of time limit and other aspects of immigration detention (para.179).
  • The decision to detain is a purely administrative one taken by Immigration Officers or Home Office caseworkers, and is not automatically reviewed by a court or an independent review body (para.178).
  • Foreign nationals continue to be held in prisons at the end of their sentence, rather than being transferred to an IRC (para.180).

In its response to the CPT’s 2017 report, the UK Government states that:

  • Although there is no fixed time limit on immigration detention in the UK, published Home Office detention policy is clear that there is always a presumption of liberty and that detention should only ever be used sparingly, and domestic case law is clear that detention powers can be exercised only if there is a reasonable prospect of an individual’s removal from the UK within a reasonable timeframe (para.266).
  • Once an individual has been detained their detention remains under review at least at monthly intervals to ensure that it remains lawful and in line with Home Office policy (para.267).
  • The UK Government accepted the broad thrust of the recommendations made by Stephen Shaw in his review of immigration detention, and has made a number of changes (see paras.269-275).
  • There is now a duty on the Secretary of State to arrange consideration of bail before the First-tier Tribunal at four months from the point of initial detention, or the date of the last Tribunal consideration of bail, and every four months thereafter (para.268).
  • All foreign national prisoners are risk assessed at the end of their sentence to determine their suitability for a transfer into the immigration detention estate, ensuring that the security and safety of the estate is maintained (para.275).

The CPT’s Factsheet on Immigration Detention (2017) 

In this factsheet, the Committee is strongly critical of indefinite detention. The UK is the only country in Europe not to have a time limit on immigration detention.

The prolonged detention of persons under aliens legislation, without a time limit and with unclear prospects for release, could easily be considered as amounting to inhuman treatment.

European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (2017), p.2

 

United Nations Human Rights Council

 

The Human Rights Council is a United Nations intergovernmental body responsible for strengthening the protection of human rights and addressing human rights violations around the world. It is comprised of 47 UN member states elected by the UN General Assembly.

Its Universal Periodic Review (UPR) mechanism allows the Council to assess the human rights situation in each UN member state on a rolling basis. Each UPR is conducted by the Human Right’s Council’s UPR Working Group which is made up of all 47 members of the Human Rights Council, though any of the UN Member States may participate in the UPR.

The reviews are based on information provided by the State under review; information from the reports of independent human rights experts and groups, human rights treaty bodies, and other UN entities; and ‘shadow reports‘ from other stakeholders including national human rights institutions and non-governmental organisations.

The Working Group’s Report on the UK’s UPR (2017)

This report voiced concern about the lack of a statutory time limit on immigration detention in the UK. Several states recommended the introduction of a time limit, ending the detention of vulnerable individuals, and the implementation of alternatives to detention.

In its response, the UK Government observed that:

  • Although there is no statutory time limit on immigration detention in the UK, it is not lawfully possible to detain persons indefinitely. UK detention policy operates with a presumption of liberty: detention must be a last resort and alternatives to detention (temporary admission or temporary release) must be considered before a decision to detain is made (p.18).
  • Once detained, an individual’s continued detention remains under regular review by the UK Government to ensure that it remains lawful and in line with government’s policy. Where this no longer applies, detainees are released. Individuals may also apply for release from detention on immigration bail and challenge the lawfulness of their detention in the courts (p.18).

 

United Nations Committee Against Torture (CAT)

 

The UN Committee Against Torture is a body of ten independent experts that monitors the implementation of the UN Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment by states parties. It was established by the UN General Assembly under Article 17 of the Convention, and first met in 1988.

States parties are required to submit regular reports which the Committee examines, setting out its concerns and recommendations in the form of ‘concluding observations’. Evidence can also be submitted by civil society organisations for consideration by the Committee in the form of an alternative ‘shadow report’. In some circumstances, the Committee is also able to undertake inquiries and consider individual and inter-state complaints.

Concluding Observations on the UK’s 5th Periodic Report (2013)

In its latest response to the UK, the Committee urges the government to:

  • Ensure that detention is used only as a last resort, in accordance with the requirements of international law, and not for administrative convenience (para.30(a)).
  • Introduce a limit for immigration detention and take all necessary steps to prevent cases of de facto indefinite detention (para.30(c)).

The UK’s next periodic report is due in 2019. Civil society organisations are invited to submit evidence by April 2019 to cat@ohchr.org.

 

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

 

UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is a global organization dedicated to saving lives, protecting rights and building a better future for refugees, forcibly displaced communities and stateless people.

As part of its Global Strategy – Beyond Detention 2014-2019, UNHCR is working with governments, international and national non-governmental organizations and other relevant stakeholders to address some of the main challenges and concerns around governmental detention policies and practices around the world. Its main areas of focus include vulnerability and alternatives to detention, and it has published a number of briefing papers on these issues.

With respect to the UK, UNHCR is focusing on the introduction of a time limit on immigration detention, and the implementation of alternatives to detention.

National Action Plan for the UK (2015)

The UK is one of UNHCR’s 12 focus countries. In its initial action plan, UNHCR observed that:

  • The UK relies on and utilises detention in asylum procedures more frequently than in other countries in the EU. In 2014, over 30,000 individuals entered immigration detention, almost 14,000 of whom were asylum-seekers. The UK is also one of a handful of countries without a maximum time limit on immigration detention.
  • UNHCR will work with the Government and with other partners to explore the possibility of developing a policy on alternatives to detention, including introducing alternatives to detention for asylum detainees on a pilot basis in the UK.
  • UNHCR is also focused on supporting the introduction of a maximum time limit on immigration detention in the UK.

Progress Report for the UK (2016)

In its following up progress report, UNHCR recognised progress made:

  • Detained Fast Track (DFT) successfully challenged in court by Detention Action and individual claimants and subsequently suspended.
  • Launch by the NGO Detention Action in April 2014 of a new pilot alternative to detention (ATD) project for ex-offender men aged 18-30 at risk of long-term immigration detention, a project whichpromotes compliance with conditions of release and minimises risk of re-offending through assisting reintegration through one-to-one case managementand community participation.

  • Parliamentary inquiry into the use of immigration detention generated Parliamentary debates in both the House of Commons and the House of Lords, calling on the UK Government to implement a time limit for detention and to explore the use of alternatives.
  • Publication of the Shaw Review commissioned bythe Home Office to review the welfare of detainees,which reveals the damage of immigration detention on mental health and calls for a reduction in its use.

However, it also drew attention to factors that still need to be addressed:

  • The UK still does not have a time limit on detention and only minimal progress was achieved through the Immigration Act 2016, which introduced automatic judicial reviewafter 4 months of detention and a time limit of not more than 72 hours for pregnant women

 

Council of Europe's Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (GRETA)

 

GRETA is responsible for monitoring the implementation of the Council of Europe’s Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings by states parties. It conducts visits and publishes country reports evaluating steps taken to give effect to the Convention.

GRETA’s Report on the UK’s implementation of the Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (2016) 

GRETA observed that many potential survivors of trafficking continue to be held in immigration detention in the UK. It recommends that the UK government:

  • improve the identification of victims of trafficking in detention centres and ensure that following a positive reasonable grounds decision, possible victims of trafficking are speedily removed from detention and offered assistance and protection as provided in the Convention (para.167).